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Awareness Magazine
5753-G Santa Ana Canyon Rd. #582
Anaheim, CA 92807
(714) 283-3385
(800) 758-3223
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People vs. The State of Illusion®

By Austin Vickers

I began my career as a trial lawyer and was always fascinated by the distinct aura and excitement in the courtroom. You eagerly wait for the judge to enter the room, at which point he or she takes their seat on an elevated stand. In the courtroom, the judge is God, and has all the power to make decisions that can literally affect every part of a person’s life.

In the trial of life, we get to play the role of judge. Life presents a variety of ideas and options, from which we all must make judgments. Thus, the role of judgment as choice is necessary to the manifestation of our individual experience.

When judgments shifts, however, from an internal experience of choice to an external experience utilized to elevate ourselves above others, it becomes a tool of the ego, designed to help us feel more powerful by imagining others as less so.

As a tool of the ego, our judgments can quickly become unconscious, shifting from choices to regurgitations of predetermined thoughts that have been projected onto us by our families or culture. Living this way, we begin doing things we think we “should do,” rather than using judgment as choice to fulfill the longings of our souls. Such judgments soon end up imprisoning us in a state of illusion and discontent.

However, hidden within the prison walls that restrain us are keys to their destruction. Like is often the case, I think nature can shed light on how to escape our prisons and deconstruct the state of illusion that many of us live within.

To the human eye, the spider web, although intricate in complexity, looks unremarkable in color. However, the strands of a spider’s web actually exhibit extraordinary colors. They are not perceptible to us because we can’t perceive the frequencies of ultraviolet light they reflect.

These extraordinary colors are perceptible, however, to an insect like a fly, because their eyes are much more sensitive to ultraviolet light than our own. This is why an insect will fly into the web. The spider’s web, one can conclude, was created more for the experience of spiders and insects, than for ours.

Likewise, a person or thing that may appear to someone else as colorless, to us may appear as an irresistible array of vivid colors to which we are wildly attracted. The reason for the difference in this perception, is not because of some implicit value in the person or thing being experienced, but rather because our individual souls each require a different experience.

Many of us, however, use such differences in attractions and perceptions as a tool of the ego, rather than as a defining tool of the soul. Applying our own judgments to the choices made by others allows us to unconsciously elevate ourselves and feel an illusionary sense of power. In doing so, however, we ignore the fact that the attractions and choices of others, despite how we might judge them, are necessary for their soul’s experience, and not our own.

An important step towards deconstructing the prison walls of illusion is pursuing courageously your own attractions through judgment experienced as choice, rather than allowing judgment to become an external experience used to acquire inauthentic power.

When you can do so, place yourself squarely on the path to personal transformation.

Austin Vickers, a former trial lawyer, is a professional speaker, and the writer and producer of People v. The State of Illusion, a powerful new film on the science and power of imagination, is distributed by Samuel Goldwyn Films, opening in cities across the country. For more information, visit: www.TheStateOfIllusion.com To learn more about Austin Vickers, visit: www.austinvickers.com